EXPERIENCE THE WARMTH OF
INUIT NATIONAL PARKS

Land of the Inuit of Quebec’s Far North, the Nunavik region is the gateway to the Arctic, opening the door to a true winter wonderland. Concealed North of the 55th parallel, this vast territory, extending on more than 500,000 km2 of wide-open spaces, is home to three exceptional national parks, which make the ideal playground for nature lovers in search of an authentic adventure. Its guardians, the Inuit a friendly people of many legends will welcome you with warmth that is sure to break the ice and share their knowledge of this great land of theirs as you join them for an immersion into their vibrant culture.

FOLLOWING INUIT ANCESTORS’ FOOTSTEPS
IN THE HEART OF THE KUURURJUAQ NATIONAL PARK

kKuururjuaq Backcountry Skiing_j_daoust

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Once upon a time, in the not-so-distant past, still very vibrant in their elders’ recollections, Inuit travelled along the natural corridor that the winding flow of the Koroc River extends in the foothills of the Torngat mountains, used by their ancestors for millenniums. Taking its source in this striking mountain range —the highest in North America east of the Rockies, which serves as a physical border between Nunavik and Labrador, this majestic waterway ending its boisterous journey in the Ungava Bay, some 160 km downstream, turns into a true freeway once detained in ice comes winter. Endowed with spectacular summits, such as Mount D’Iberville, looming 1,646 metres above, keeping watch over the park named after the glorious Koroc River valley, wonder and exaltation await backcountry skiing and alpine snowshoeing enthusiasts in this mythical land.

WALKING ON THE MOON
IN THE PINGUALUIT CRATER NATIONAL PARK

pingualuit_snowkite_francois_carrier1Circa 1.4 million years ago, a meteorite struck the earth, leaving a seamlessly circular crater of a 3.4 km diameter on the wind-swept tundra of the Ungava plateau. Rising distinctively above the horizon of the boundless Arctic sky, the Pingualuit crater and its lunar-like surroundings are the closest most of us will get to walking on the moon. The place certainly inspires meditation and calm to those who venture into this national park, backcountry skiing their way across its treeless expanse. And for those looking for a bit more thrill, adding a kite to let the North wind haul you across the snow-covered tundra will do the trick, making this expedition an unparalleled northern experience.

A GENUINE NOMADIC JOURNEY
THROUGH THE TURSUJUQ NATIONAL PARK

tursujuq_snowmobile_michel_harcc-morissette1Behind a narrow passage on the eastern shores of the mighty Hudson Bay, beyond the Inuit community of Umiujaq, lays hidden the largest national park in Quebec: the Tursujuq national park, Nunavik’s best kept secret, with 26,107 km2 to enjoy. Etched in spectacular cuestas, this immense territory is also a cultural crossroads between Inuit and Cree, with traces of human occupation in the area dating back more than 3,000 years. As you travel from the inland sea of Lake Tasiujaq to the shores of Hudson Bay and the tumbling Nastapoka Falls, whether at your own pace on backcountry ski or snowshoe or carried by snowmobile across this vast expanse, you will be transported back in time as you sahre the Inuit way of life with your guides.

For more information on Nunavik’s national parks, visit www.nunavikparks.ca or call 1-844-NUNAVIK (686-2845) toll free to book your all-inclusive winter package in one of these amazing places of this Far North region of Quebec, Canada.